Category Archives: Writers Unite! Tips Tools Tidbits

Writing Tips, Tools, and Tidbits!: APPRAISE versus APPRISE

Writers Unite!’s mission is to offer a haven for writers to share their work and hone their craft. As the writing process is our focus, author, and WU! admin, Lynn Miclea has created a series of “tips, tools, and tidbits” about writing for our members or anyone interested in writing to help improve their writing. Check the menu bar for any tips you may have missed or click on this link.

Writing Tips, Tools, and Tidbits!

Images are free use and require no attribution. Image from Pixabay.

APPRAISE versus APPRISE

People often mix up the words appraise and apprise. These words have different meanings and uses, and this should help to use them properly.

Appraise is a verb that means to determine, assess, or estimate the value of something. The “praise” ending sounds like praise. If you mean to determine or assess a value, use appraise.

Examples:

  • She wanted to get the ring appraised.
  • He needed to get the car appraised before it was sold.
  • She asked for the house to be appraised before she made an offer.
  • That man will appraise the diamond and tell me what it’s worth.
  • He will appraise the house and then we can sell it.
  • She asked to have the vehicle appraised.
  • He decided to have the watch appraised to know its value.
  • After getting the jewelry appraised, she set a higher sale price.
  • He had the painting appraised and was astounded at the value.
  • The agent went there to appraise the property.

Apprise is a verb that means to inform, tell, or notify someone. The “prise” ending sounds like prize. If you mean to inform or tell someone, use apprise.

Examples:

  • His boss apprised him of what was needed.
  • He has been apprised of the facts in the case.
  • She was apprised of what he had been doing.
  • He needs to apprise his family of what happened.
  • She did not apprise her boss of the sale falling through.
  • He made sure to apprise his team of the latest development.
  • The police were apprised of the situation that developed.
  • The doctor apprised the patient of the outcome of the surgery.
  • After the meeting, the boss apprised the group of the outcome.
  • She investigated and then apprised her client of what she found.

If you mean to determine or assess a value, use appraise.

If you mean to inform or tell someone, use apprise.

After getting the house appraised, he apprised his client of the value.

Please look at the chart for an easy summary and helpful reminder.

I hope you find this helpful. These tips and more grammar tips and tools are also on my website and blog. Thank you!
Website – https://www.lynnmiclea.com/
Blog – https://lynnpuff.wordpress.com/

Writing Tips, Tools, and Tidbits!: SIGHT, SITE, and CITE

Writers Unite!’s mission is to offer a haven for writers to share their work and hone their craft. As the writing process is our focus, author, and WU! admin, Lynn Miclea has created a series of “tips, tools, and tidbits” about writing for our members or anyone interested in writing to help improve their writing. Check the menu bar for any tips you may have missed or click on this link.

Writing Tips, Tools, and Tidbits!

Images are free use and require no attribution. Image from Pixabay.

SIGHT, SITE, and CITE

People often mix up the words sight, site, and cite. Although these words sound alike, they have different meanings and uses. This should help to keep them straight.

Sight is a noun and means vision or ability to see or something you see. You have sight and you can see sights. If you mean vision, then use sight.

Examples:

  • The sunset over the ocean is a gorgeous sight.
  • After struggling with an injury, he was grateful to get his sight back.
  • She loved seeing all the sights when on vacation.
  • He went to the doctor and hoped his sight had improved.
  • She thought there was no end in sight to the rising prices.
  • His sight was not very good at night.

Site is a noun and means a specific place or location. If you mean place or location, then use site.

Examples:

  • This is a great site to have a picnic.
  • That is the site where they are filming a movie.
  • He loved visiting various historical sites.
  • She looked around to find the perfect site for the wedding.
  • He couldn’t wait for people to check out his new site.
  • She pointed to the site where it all happened.

Cite is a verb and means to quote, mention formally, or refer to a source. It can also mean to summon to a court or issue a notice of violation. If you mean to refer to a source or issue a citation, use cite.

Examples:

  • After becoming CEO, he cited many businesses that helped him.
  • White writing her paper, she was careful to cite her references.
  • The police brought him in for questioning and he was then cited.
  • He repeated the quote and cited the original author.
  • The students were reminded to cite their sources on their papers.
  • She reviewed the document and noted the resources that were cited.

Here is another hint you can use to help.
Sight
 can be associated with eyesight. If it involves vision or seeing, then use sight.
Site can be associated with situate. If it means a place or location, then use site.
Cite can be associated with citation. If it is a verb meaning to issue a notice or to quote something, use cite.

Please look at the chart for an easy summary and helpful reminder.

I hope you find this helpful. These tips and more grammar tips and tools are also on my website and blog. Thank you!
Website – https://www.lynnmiclea.com/
Blog – https://lynnpuff.wordpress.com/

Writing Tips, Tools, and Tidbits!: BREATH versus BREATHE

Writers Unite!’s mission is to offer a haven for writers to share their work and hone their craft. As the writing process is our focus, author, and WU! admin, Lynn Miclea has created a series of “tips, tools, and tidbits” about writing for our members or anyone interested in writing to help improve their writing. Check the menu bar for any tips you may have missed or click on this link.

Writing Tips, Tools, and Tidbits!

Images are free use and require no attribution. Image from Pixabay.

BREATH versus BREATHE

People often mix up the words breath and breathe. Although they may look similar, they are different parts of speech and are used differently. Breath is a noun, and breathe is a verb. The information shown here should help people use the words properly.

Breath is a noun that rhymes with death. It means the air that is inhaled and exhaled, respiration, or time to rest. If you are using a noun, use breath.

Examples:

  • She paused and took a deep breath.
  • He had chest pain and shortness of breath.
  • She slowly let out her breath.
  • He took a break and sat down to regain his breath.
  • She went outside for a breath of fresh air.
  • His breath was visible in the cold air.
  • She swam to the surface and took a huge breath.
  • He stopped running so he could catch his breath.
  • She had a hard time holding her breath.
  • He muttered under his breath as he left.

Breathe is a verb that rhymes with seethe. It means to take in air, to inhale and exhale, to pause or rest, or to blow lightly. If you are using a verb, use breathe.

Examples:

  • He tried to relax and breathe normally.
  • The air she was breathing was toxic.
  • He found it increasingly hard to breathe.
  • She breathed a sigh of relief after her medical exam.
  • His shirt was made of a material that breathes.
  • Her boss was always breathing down her neck.
  • She let the wine breathe before serving it.
  • He lives and breathes for hiking.
  • Breathe in through your nose.
  • Let’s breathe new life into this game.

Basically, if you want a noun, use breath.

If you want a verb, use breathe.

Hint: Breathe has an “e” at the end and a long “ee” sound.

If it’s cold, you can see your breath when you breathe.

Please look at the chart for an easy summary and helpful reminder.

I hope you find this helpful. These tips and more grammar tips and tools are also on my website and blog. Thank you!
Website – https://www.lynnmiclea.com/
Blog – https://lynnpuff.wordpress.com/

WRITING TIPS, TOOLS, AND TIDBITS!: Bring versus Take

Writers Unite!’s mission is to offer a haven for writers to share their work and hone their craft. As the writing process is our focus, author, and WU! admin, Lynn Miclea has created a series of “tips, tools, and tidbits” about writing for our members or anyone interested in writing to help improve their writing. Check the menu bar for any tips you may have missed or click on this link.

Writing Tips, Tools, and Tidbits!

Images are free use and require no attribution. Image from Pixabay.

BRING versus TAKE

People often mix up the words “bring” and “take.” Although similar and there is some overlap, for the most part these words should be used differently. If you know the direction of movement, that will help to use the words properly.

Bring is used when movement is toward the speaker or listener, or when someone is coming to you. Bring that here; bring it to me; I’ll bring it to you. If you can use “come” with it, then use bring. Come here — bring it here. She’s coming and she’ll bring it. I’ll bring it when I come over. When movement is toward the speaker or listener, use bring.

Examples:

  • Please bring me that book.
  • When you come to our house, don’t forget to bring a cake.
  • Can you bring me a cup of coffee?
  • Every time she visits me, she brings a small gift.
  • We will bring the pictures to you when we visit.
  • Bring a friend with you when you come over.
  • She is bringing the sandwiches to our party.
  • Bring that with you when you come here.
  • Do you want us to bring anything when we come over?
  • Don’t forget to bring your bathing suit when you come here.

Take is used when movement is away from the speaker or listener, or when someone is going away from you. Take that over there; take that to him; take it to them. If you can use “go” with it, then use take. Go there — take it there. He’s going there and he’ll take it. Take it with you when you leave. She’ll take it to them. When movement is away from the speaker or listener, use take.

Examples:

  • Please take this book to Jack.
  • When you go to the store, make sure you take the list.
  • Can you take the silverware to the customers at that table?
  • Let’s take the package to the post office.
  • The taxi will take him to the airport.
  • We need to take out the garbage.
  • Please take that with you when you leave.
  • Can you take the kids to school today?
  • She is taking the cooler to the park.
  • Let’s take the dog to the beach.

Basically, if movement is toward the speaker or listener, use bring. If you can use “come” with it, then use bring.


If movement is away from the speaker or listener, use take. If you can use “go” with it, then use take.


If the direction of movement or point of view is unclear, uncertain, or not relevant, then either word can be used.

Example: 

Let’s take this with us.
Let’s bring this with us.

Both are fine, and it would depend on context and which part of the journey or movement you’re focusing on.



Please look at the chart for an easy summary and helpful reminder.

I hope you find this helpful. These tips and more grammar tips and tools are also on my website and blog. Thank you!
Website – https://www.lynnmiclea.com/
Blog – https://lynnpuff.wordpress.com/

Writing Tips, Tools, and Tidbits!: Past versus Passed

Writers Unite!’s mission is to offer a haven for writers to share their work and hone their craft. As the writing process is our focus, author, and WU! admin, Lynn Miclea has created a series of “tips, tools, and tidbits” about writing for our members or anyone interested in writing to help improve their writing. Check the menu bar for any tips you may have missed or click on this link.

Writing Tips, Tools, and Tidbits!

Images are free use and require no attribution. Image from Pixabay.

PAST versus PASSED

People often mix up the words past and passed. They may sound the same, but these words are different parts of speech and have different meanings and uses.

***

Past is not a verb and the tense cannot be changed. It can be many other parts of speech and have multiple meanings, but it is not a verb or an action itself. If it is not a verb, and you cannot change the tense, then use past.

Examples:

  • I walked past his house.
  • It is past her bedtime.
  • He turned in the report past the deadline.
  • It is half past three and I’m late.
  • That happened in the past.
  • She was lost in her memories of past times.
  • The gas station is past the old movie theater.
  • He ran past the post office this morning.
  • She excels because of her past experience.

***

Passed is always a verb and is the past tense of pass. Since it is a verb, the tense can be changed — pass, passes, passing, passed, will pass. If you are using a verb or doing an action, and the tense can be changed, then use passed.

Examples:

  • She passed the coffee shop when she drove to my house.
  • He passed the main entrance before he finally found it.
  • She passed out from exhaustion.
  • He passed the book to his teacher.
  • She passed her test.
  • They passed the papers around the room.
  • Time passed slowly while waiting for the bell to ring.
  • They passed each other in the hallway.
  • He passed the time by telling jokes.

***

A simple test: If you can change the tense (passed, pass, passing, will pass, passes), then use passed. If you cannot, use past.
Basically, if it is a verb and can change tense, use passed.
If it is not a verb and cannot change tense, then use past.

***

To further help illustrate this, the following sentences are similar, but one column uses past and the other uses passed — it depends on how the words are used.

• She walked past the house. • She passed the house.
• It is past his bedtime. • He has passed his bedtime.
• They ran past the end zone. • They passed the end zone.
• It is now past the deadline. • She has passed the deadline.
• He drove past the zoo. • He passed the zoo when he drove.
• She went past the restaurant. • She passed by the restaurant.

In the first column, past is not a verb and cannot change tense — past is correct here. In the second column, passed is clearly a verb and can change tense — passed is correct here.

————–

Please look at the chart for an easy summary and helpful reminder.

***
I hope you find this helpful. These tips and more grammar tips and tools are also on my website and blog. Thank you!
Website – https://www.lynnmiclea.com/
Blog – https://lynnpuff.wordpress.com/

WRITING TIP, TOOLS, AND TIDBITS: FURTHER versus FARTHER

Writers Unite!’s mission is to offer a haven for writers to share their work and hone their craft. As the writing process is our focus, author, and WU! admin, Lynn Miclea has created a series of “tips, tools, and tidbits” about writing for our members or anyone interested in writing to help improve their writing. Check the menu bar for any tips you may have missed or click on this link.

Writing Tips, Tools, and Tidbits!

Images are free use and require no attribution. Image from Pixabay.

FURTHER versus FARTHER

People often mix up the words further and farther. Although there is an overlap, these words are generally used in different ways.

Further refers to metaphorical, symbolic, or figurative distance, not physical distance. Further can also mean additional or more, moreover, and to advance. If you can replace it with additional or more, or if it does not involve physical distance, use further.

Examples:

  • Let’s discuss this further.
  • I’d like to go into further detail about that.
  • He needs to know what their further plans are.
  • She wanted to further the project.
  • Further, this is not appropriate here.
  • He needs further instruction.
  • Your statement could not be further from the truth.
  • She asked, but no further details were given.

Farther refers only to physical distance or distance that can be measured. Hint: farther has the word far in it. If it refers to physical distance, use farther.

Examples:

  • They walked farther down the road.
  • You’re almost there; it’s just a little bit farther.
  • He rowed farther out onto the lake.
  • The farther you go, the more farms you’ll see.
  • She is much farther away by now.
  • He was exhausted and could not go any farther.
  • How much farther is it?
  • His house is farther down that street.

Basically, if it refers to symbolic or figurative distance, or if you can replace it with additional or more, use further.

If it relates to physical distance, use farther.

If it is ambiguous and unclear, or if it does not involve physical distance, it is better to use further.

Hint: Farther has the word far in it. For physical distance, use farther. For all other meanings, use further.

Please look at the chart for an easy summary and helpful reminder.

————

I hope you find this helpful. These tips and more grammar tips and tools are also on my website and blog. Thank you!
Website – https://www.lynnmiclea.com/
Blog – https://lynnpuff.wordpress.com/

Writing Tip, Tools, and Tidbits: Affect vs Effect

Writers Unite!’s mission is to offer a haven for writers to share their work and hone their craft. As the writing process is our focus, author, and WU! admin, Lynn Miclea has created a series of “tips, tools, and tidbits” about writing for our members or anyone interested in writing to help improve their writing. Check the menu bar for any tips you may have missed or click on this link.

Writing Tips, Tools, and Tidbits!

Images are free use and require no attribution. Image from Pixabay.

AFFECT versus EFFECT

People often mix up the words affect and effect. They may sound the same for most uses (although they do sound different with other purposes and contexts), but these words have different meanings and uses. This should help you to use them properly.

Affect is usually a verb and means to impact, change, alter, influence, or modify something. One thing affects another — A affects B. If you can substitute another verb such as change or alter, then use affect.

Examples:

  • The rain affected our plans to be outside.
  • This medication will affect his muscles.
  • This cold weather is affecting my mood.
  • My supervisor’s attitude affects my morale.
  • All that construction is affecting traffic.
  • His illness really affected her.
  • Coffee definitely affects my energy level.

Effect is usually a noun and means the outcome, result, or consequence. One thing causes an effect on something — A has an effect on B. If you can substitute another noun such as outcome or result, then use effect.

Examples:

  • The rain had an effect on our plans.
  • The medication had a strong effect on him.
  • This cold weather has an effect on my mood.
  • My supervisor’s attitude has an effect on my morale.
  • The construction has a big effect on traffic.
  • His illness had a big effect on her.
  • Coffee has a huge effect on my energy level.

A hint to help you remember:

A is for Action. If it is action — which starts with an “a” — use affect.
E is for End result. If it is an end result — which starts with an “e” — use effect.

A simple test: If you can substitute a verb such as alter, use affect.
If you can substitute a noun such as result, use effect.

Additional meanings and uses:

Affect can also be a noun meaning emotion, feeling, or emotional response, and is generally used in a psychological context. Please note this word is pronounced differently, with an accent on the first syllable.

Examples:

  • She had a flat affect when the therapist spoke with her.
  • His affect did not change after getting the devastating news.
  • She had a sad and subdued affect after her mother passed.

Effect can also be a verb meaning bring about or create.

Examples:

  • They wanted to effect change in how things were done.
  • The protests may effect a change in the rules.
  • She tried to effect change in the grading system.

However, these meanings and uses are not as common.

Please look at the chart for an easy summary and helpful reminder.

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I hope you find this helpful. These tips and more grammar tips and tools are also on my website and blog. Thank you!
Website – https://www.lynnmiclea.com/
Blog – https://lynnpuff.wordpress.com/

Writing Tips, Tools, and Tidbits: Who versus Whom

Writers Unite!’s mission is to offer a haven for writers to share their work and hone their craft. As the writing process is our focus, author, and WU! admin, Lynn Miclea has created a series of “tips, tools, and tidbits” about writing for our members or anyone interested in writing to help improve their writing. Check the menu bar for any tips you may have missed or click on this link.

Writing Tips, Tools, and Tidbits!

Images are free use and require no attribution. Image from Pixabay.

WHO versus WHOM

People often mix up the words who and whom, and it can be confusing to know when to use which one. However, these words have specific functions and are used differently, and this should help you keep it straight.

Who is used when it is the subject of a sentence. Who is always the subject to a verb and performs the action. If you can replace it with he or she or they (he/she is doing the action; they are doing the action), use who.

Examples:

  • Who is going to the party? (He is going. / They are going.)
  • Who wants to go first? (She wants to go first.)
  • Who is your best friend? (She is your best friend.)
  • I know who your brother is. (He is your brother.)
  • Who baked this amazing cake? (She baked it.)
  • Who wants to go to the movie with me? (They want to go.)
  • Who ate the last piece of pizza? (She ate it.)
  • Who told me about the storm? (He told me. / They told me.)
  • I don’t remember who she is. (She is your neighbor.)

Whom is used when referring to the object of a verb or preposition, such to whom, for whom, or with whom, and it receives the action. If you can replace it with him or her or them (give this to him/her/them), use whom.

Examples:

  • To whom should I address this? (Address it to him.)
  • With whom am I speaking? Whom am I speaking with? (I am speaking with her.)
  • I don’t yet know with whom I will go to the game. (I will go with him.)
  • Whom should I talk to about that incident? (Talk to her.)
  • Whom should I ask? (Ask him.)
  • Those boys are very nice, one of whom is my brother. (One of them is my brother.)
  • The man to whom I sold my book is handsome. (I sold it to him.)
  • That is the woman with whom I will share a ride. (I will ride with her.)
  • To whom it may concern. (It concerns him. / It concerns them.)

Basically, if it is the subject doing the action and you can use he, she, or they, use who.

If it is the object receiving the action and you can use him, her, or them, use whom.

Another example: Who helped whom. / He helped her; they helped them.

Please look at the chart for an easy summary and helpful reminder.

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I hope you find this helpful. These tips and more grammar tips and tools are also on my website and blog. Thank you!
Website – https://www.lynnmiclea.com/
Blog – https://lynnpuff.wordpress.com/

WRITING TIPS, TOOLS, AND TIDBITS: 

Writers Unite!’s mission is to offer a haven for writers to share their work and hone their craft. As the writing process is our focus, author, and WU! admin, Lynn Miclea has created a series of “tips, tools, and tidbits” about writing for our members or anyone interested in writing to help improve their writing. Check the menu bar for any tips you may have missed or click on this link.

Writing Tips, Tools, and Tidbits!

Images are free use and require no attribution. Image from Pixabay.


THEIR, THEY’RE, and THERE


People often mix up the words their, they’re, and there. They may sound alike, but these words have different meanings and uses.

Their is possessive and means that something belongs to them. If you want to show possession or ownership, then use the word their. Their will always refer to and be followed by a noun (although not always immediately).

Examples:

  • This is their car
  • It’s now their time to shine.
  • Their dog is really cute.
  • That is their contribution.
  • I need to return their blue umbrella.
  • I wonder where they mailed their payment.

They’re is a contraction of “they are.” The apostrophe shows a letter is missing. If you can replace it with the words “they are,” then use they’re.

Examples:

  • They’re always on time.
  • They’re going to the party later.
  • I think they’re very smart.
  • It seems like they’re always fighting.
  • They’re coming for dinner later.
  • They’re excellent dancers.

There indicates a location and is the opposite of here — not here, but there. If you are referring to a location, use there.

Examples:

  • Let’s put the small table over there.
  • I think the party is being held there now.
  • He likes walking there by the lake.
  • There would be a great place for dinner.
  • It’s dangerous to go there at night.
  • I don’t want the picture here, let’s put it there on that wall.

Basically, if it is possessive or shows ownership, then use their. If it is a contraction of “they are,” then use they’re. If it indicates a location, use there.

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Here is another hint you can use to help. Their has the word heir in it, which indicates possession. They’re has an apostrophe, which often indicates a letter missing. If you can substitute they are, then use they’re. There has the word here in it, which indicates location.

—————

Please look at the chart for an easy summary and helpful reminder.

*******

I hope you find this helpful. These tips and more grammar tips and tools are also on my website and blog. Thank you!
Website – https://www.lynnmiclea.com/Blog – https://lynnpuff.wordpress.com/

WRITING TIPS, TOOLS, AND TIDBITS: Your versus You’re

Writers Unite!’s mission is to offer a haven for writers to share their work and hone their craft. As the writing process is our focus, author, and WU! admin, Lynn Miclea has created a series of “tips, tools, and tidbits” about writing for our members or anyone interested in writing to help improve their writing. Check the menu bar for any tips you may have missed or click on this link.

Writing Tips, Tools, and Tidbits!

Images are free use and require no attribution. Image from Pixabay.

YOUR versus YOU’RE

People often mix up the words your and you’re. They may sound the same, but these words have different meanings and uses.

Your is possessive and means that something belongs to you. If you want to show possession or ownership, then use the word your with no apostrophe. Your is always followed by a noun in a sentence (although not always immediately).

Examples:

  • I think this is your sweater.
  • What is your name?
  • Salads are good for your health.
  • What are you planning for your birthday?
  • Is this your phone?
  • Turn in your report by tomorrow.
  • How is your new job working out?
  • I love your new dress.

You’re is a contraction of “you are.” The apostrophe shows a letter is missing. If you can replace it with the words “you are,” then use you’re with the apostrophe.

Examples:

  • You’re very good at that.
  • You’re going to get wet if you go out in the rain.
  • It looks like you’re going to the store now.
  • You’re going to love this book.
  • You’re going to need a coat if you go out.
  • You look relaxed when you’re in that chair.
  • You’re very funny.
  • Send me a postcard when you’re in Hawaii.

Basically, if it is possessive or shows ownership, use your.

If it is a contraction of “you are,” use you’re.

A simple test: If you can substitute “you are,” then use you’re. If not, then use your.

—————

Please look at the chart for an easy summary and helpful reminder.

I hope you find this helpful. These tips and more grammar tips and tools are also on my website and blog. Thank you!
Website – https://www.lynnmiclea.com/
Blog – https://lynnpuff.wordpress.com/