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Changing POV

changingPOV

Changing POV is not head-hopping. The term ‘head-hopping’ means that a POV is changed so much in a scene that the reader is being forced to hop around so much they’re dizzy with it. And because of that they’re confused as to who is doing what, which is something you never want to have in your story.

So, how do you avoid that if you want to change POV in a scene?

First, make your character’s voice distinctive enough so that when you change POV it’s a seamless transition. This means that when you’re in a particular character’s POV you’re using a very distinctive voice for them, and I’m not just talking about the way they speak in dialogue. Each character should have a distinctive way of thinking and acting in addition to speaking. And you don’t need to make the differences super-obvious or extremely-different unless your story calls for that.

Two, understand what you want to do in a particular scene in terms of action and what information you want to reveal about the plot and characters. Sometimes it may be best to stay in one character’s POV because if you go into another character’s POV you’ll reveal a plot detail before you need to. I did this in the very first scene of my novel-in-progress because if I had gone into my other character’s POV I would have spoiled the key surprise plot element, so to speak.

Three, think of the development of the scene in a cinematic way. When you watch a movie for example, most of the time there are cuts within a scene to show the reactions of other characters to what’s happening. So if you feel that need to cut to another character in your scene, then you’re looking to change POV.

Now, I know there are what I call POV-purists who believe in one POV per scene and will only change POV with a line or scene break clearly showing that on the page. And that’s perfectly fine as I’ve read plenty of books written like that I enjoyed. But please don’t feel like you have to do that. Maybe the thought of changing POV in a scene is daunting or you’re not sure of how or when to do it. Don’t be afraid to give a try and in the meantime, study other writers and see how they do things.

Most of all, don’t feel like there is a set of rules governing POV that you can’t break unless you want to go to jail. Trust me, you will not be jailed for changing POV in a scene. If you do it and someone says you’re head-hopping, then you’ll need to look at your work more closely to make sure your changes in POV are seamless. But trust me, it can be done if you want to do it.

Writing Your First Novel

One of the common questions asked by novice writers on our sister Facebook site Writers Unite! is “How do I start?” To help new writers with the daunting but fun task of writing, I have begun a series of articles on how to prepare writing your first novel.

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Writing Your First Novel

Part One

Read

 “Everybody has a secret world inside of them. I mean everybody. All of the people in the whole world, I mean everybody — no matter how dull and boring they are on the outside. Inside them they’ve all got unimaginable, magnificent, wonderful, stupid, amazing worlds… Not just one world. Hundreds of them. Thousands, maybe.”
― Neil GaimanThe Sandman, Vol. 5: A Game of You

All those words Gaiman speaks of rattle around inside of us. Eventually, the urge to allow them to escape becomes overwhelming. Time to write a story.

Fledgling writers come from all walks of life with a wide-ranging knowledge of the writing process. I remember my own experience when I decided to begin writing. Writing was not new to me, throughout my career I had written research papers, manuals, newsletters, speeches, and advertising copy.  However, crafting a fiction story was something I had not done since college. I recognized there was a lot to learn.

The question is where to start?  We can jump right in and begin to put words to paper or screen but are we providing ourselves and our future readers with the best effort we can make? Before we write, let’s explore the steps we should do to prepare ourselves to be good writers. Let’s begin with reading.

Read

What better than a book to fuel the imagination. One of my favorite quotes is from George R. R. Martin, A Dance with Dragons:

“A reader lives a thousand lives before he dies, said Jojen. The man who never reads lives only one.”

Reading the works of others is fundamental to the writing process. Any genre and any author (even a not so skilled author) can provide you with useful information. I do recommend selecting best-selling books in the genre/genres that you wish to write in, as well. Successful works related to the story you want to write can provide you with trends and what the readers of the genre prefer.

What you do you as a new author gain by reading? There are several reasons:

Vocabulary:

Reading increases vocabulary by presenting words we may not hear or see on a normal day. A diverse vocabulary is a great asset for any writer by providing an enhanced collection of words that convey the meanings and emotions of your story. A large vocabulary also provides alternate word choices which improve your writing style.

Grammar:

Grammar rules are analogous to rules of the road. Authorities expect us to obey the speed limit, stop at red lights, and follow the other traffic laws. Otherwise, chaos ensues on the roads. The same is true for writing. Grammar rules provide a framework for writing a clear and concise story that a reader expects. When reading, pay attention to sentence structure, verb choice and agreement, how complex or simple the sentence are. You will begin to acquire a feel for the author’s style which can help you find your own.

Plot Structure:

Read to understand how the author constructed their story. How do they open their novel, what hook did they use to draw you into the story? Notice the author introduces their main and secondary characters, build tension toward the climax, or employ foreshadowing, plot twists? Learn what techniques work to provide the reader with an exciting and emotional experience.

Trends:

While you should read all genres for a better overview of style, you should also select numerous books within the genre that you wish to write in. Trends are not only for clothing, but genres are also subject to the latest fad or the focus of a best-selling author. Knowing what your potential reader might prefer when choosing a new novel. A word of caution, trends fade, and by the time your novel is ready for publication, some other trend may have taken your place. Write your story the way you want.

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In subsequent articles, we will look at these topics in more depth as well as other tools for the novice writer.

(Quotes: https://www.brainyquote.com/)

Writers Unite! Short Story Contest Winners!

Our FaceBook sister page Writers Unite! Short Stories hosted a contest in January 2017! We would like to present our winners.

The contest criteria:

Theme:  Love Conquer All

Genre: Open

Word Count: 3,000 words or less.

 

First Place:

The Girl With the Razzle-Dazzle Eyes by Milton Trachtenburg

https://docs.google.com/…/1NlKgkyQrq4_tBteGNQFx6xEKbT…/edit…

Second Place:

Paradise Beach by David Weeks

https://docs.google.com/…/1SHSTxf4bCz74_q1TlGPVdUzsmz…/edit…

Third Place:

Even From Behind These Walls by A.M. Ameenah M Hassan.

https://docs.google.com/…/14EKxFsSirU0k4TNDCE-n-4xrHM…/edit…

Honorable Mention:

A Mother’s Reflection by Leonie Hearn

https://docs.google.com/…/1_C5HyHW0rxl3M6btLBY-y4iDex…/edit…

Please join me in thanking our judges, Mandy Melanson, Dennis Takesako, and Dusty Grein. All excellent writers and all devoted to sharing their expertise with aspiring writers. I encourage you to visit their FB pages and author pages.

Also, special thanks to all who submitted entries. The judges were faced with a very difficult decision.

 

Writers Unite! Bookshop is now on the “WU!” Blog

In addition to the Bookstore post available Friday through Sunday on our Facebook page for you to post links to your published works, we are adding the Bookstore to our Blog.

You will find the Bookstore on the menu bar. Click on the drop down menu to locate your favorite genre and find a new book to enjoy!

If you would like to have your book info posted on our blog, please email us at writersunite16@gmail.com using WU Bookstore in the subject line.

Please include the following:

  • Book title, author’s name, and links to sites where your book can be purchased.
  • A very brief blurb about your book. (150 words or less)
  • Thumbnail copy of book cover
  • Books Rating: G, PG, R, X (this category must include a warning,)
  • The general genre of your novel. The books will be sorted by the main genre categories.

Those genres are as follows:

  • Action / Adventure
  • Contemporary/ YA
  • Fantasy
  • Historical
  • Horror
  • Literary / Other
  • Mystery
  • Nonfiction
  • Romance
  • Poetry
  • Sci-Fi
  • Westerns

Please follow these guidelines to ensure your book sales link will be included.

The Bookstore is now open!!!

Writers Unite! on Facebook

E. Rachel Hardcastle: Writers As Ghosts

 

 

Over the years, creative writing has been my candle in a world plagued with constant blackouts. I’ve struggled with everyday life and experienced loss, like many of you surely have, and being an introvert, I found writing to be an effective outlet for expressing my thoughts and feelings in a private and personal, but very public way.

The festering question was how can I fully experience life? The idea of merely existing between working, worrying about money or illness and watching the world attack itself through war, frightened me. I needed to explore the outcome of a berserk life like that.

Reading back through my published novels, I see traces of those morals and messages between the lines of every story. Like a journal entry, each paragraph acts as a personal signature, reading, there is blood and tears on these pages. They mean something to me. They can mean something to you. And, it’s been said by several of my loyal readers that there is an unintentional, almost spiritual voice nudging my words, urging people to change for the better, like a lingering ghost.

To me, writing a novel is a chance to explore my own beliefs and musings. I’d like to leave something of worth behind. Through this subconscious mission I type and my words find meaning. My voice is forever recorded. I want to haunt my readers in the best way because, like most authors, I long to be a memorable name upon the shelves; to have something drawing people to me and thrusting them forward as so many writers once did for me.

Now the Halloween season is upon us, take a deep breath as you write and feel a part of you cross over to the world you’re creating. Release a ghost that connects deeply with your reader. Release one that persists and exists as hundreds of characters living hundreds of adventures. Inject some of your memories, struggles and lessons learned into your writing.

You’re a writer for a reason, to be someone’s ghost when they’re on the train to work, in the bath or lying in bed at night. We’ll all be someone’s ghost for real, some day. May as well start early.

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emma-hardcastle

E. Rachael Hardcastle
Author & Editor

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