Tag Archives: readers

Chris Coling: The Fan Relationship

 

Hi again. I’m looking to kick off a discussion on the matter of the important people in our line of work, or calling, or whatever label suits your approach best.

They are the readers and fans.

When I first started writing I was unsure as to whether I should even aspire to having any.

Over the first few months, response to my first book was painfully slow, but I was content enough with simply having written.

Perhaps I should remind you at this point that I self-publish through Amazon Kindle and Createspace. I am no expert, so will solely talk about my feelings and end results.

I read a number of author’s forums, where I found a general wave of opinion that was against replying to reviews or in any way interacting with the readership at large, and one’s own readers in particular. It was almost as if there was some expectation of aloofness, and a general feeling of superiority amongst the authors posting their opinions on the matter.

To me, that was not only wholly strange, but also against the way I would normally approach matters so, typically, I went against the common feeling.

I decided to respond to each and every review, regardless of content or star rating, positive or negative.

Sometimes, increasingly so, my response consisted of a simple ‘Thank you for your comment’, but occasionally I entered into discussion with a reviewer. On a few occasions I rebutted wild and fanciful claims; on others I accepted criticism that was reasonably laid.

I confess, early on, I rose to a pair of trolls who were simply there to damage my ratings as much as possible.

Nowadays, I try to avoid spats.

Perhaps I was extremely fortunate that the vast majority of my reviews were good regarding the content and style, although my editing and grammar was always getting hammered.

I also decided never to get into discussion over another author’s work. Some ‘fans’ will want to compare and will seek to draw you into discussion. My simple view is that it is unhealthy to get into such matters, and I avoid them like the proverbial plague.

As part of the development of my series, I created a website and a number of Facebook groups, and slowly they started to see more and more traffic.

In the groups, more than the website, the exchanges were more conversational and relaxed, possibly because of the nature of FB itself, which encouraged more discussion on the books, as well as on peripheral matters.

It soon became apparent to me that, by engaging people already pre-disposed to enjoying my work, they would talk about their interaction and, to all intents and purposes, were spreading the word about my work.

As I said above, engaging with people is more natural to me than not, so I did not need to try and promote a good relationship between them and myself, or indeed, between each other. It is and was a natural progression.

I ran a few competitions, for books or promotional stuff, and the last an opportunity for the winner to become a character in one of the books.

Shortly afterwards I understood that was a fantastic way to further engage the fan base, and many of my readers are characters in the books, or have family members who appear, often in an historically accurate way.

By way of an example, I wrote a delicate piece on the moral turmoil that would be felt by a USAAF bomber crew on their way to drop an atomic device on an unsuspecting Japanese city.

I sought and received the names of their relatives who had served, and the whole of the fictitious crew comprised men who were once USAAF aircrew and who had served in WW2 or just after.

Whilst I undertook that enterprise for the right reasons, it undoubtedly boosted my popularity and broadened my fan base.

The basic point of this piece is to put over that, for me, interacting with my fans/readers/followers has been a wholly positive and beneficial experience. Indeed, quite a few are now considered friends. They have also occasionally been sounding boards for proposals or resolvers of some deep problems. Specifically, I had issues with a piece of American political writing, which was overcome in a group of my US readers, where we batted out the whys and wherefores. It meant I had to change a few things along the line, but was a wholly positive experience. They also subsequently saw their names in the credits, another way to get people on board.

You will and must do what you feel comfortable with. It’s your choice, and please don’t feel that you have to shy away from such contact, simply because some group or grandee has stated it is not the done thing. Similarly, don’t do it if you feel uncomfortable with the whole thing, simply because it worked for me.

As with all things for us authors, each writer has his or her own standards and needs, and each book has its own style and merits; advice and guidance is not one size fits all.

If you do decide to engage, clearly you will have to decide upon your own limits, and the checks and balances that you will apply, but I can only say that I have found the interaction with those who have read my books and taken the time to become members of my groups and website to be a thoroughly rewarding and positive experience.

I hope this has been of use to you and that it has started a thought process that will ultimately help you.

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Chris Coling is a retired firefighter and currently works at the local hospital. A part-time writer, he is presently working on his eighth and last book in an alternate-history series, with other ideas waiting in the wings. He writes for himself in the first instance but also enjoys the fact that his books are now read widely. He resides in England.

http://www.redgambitseries.com/

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Jessica V. Fisette: How to Write a Review So Good That Authors Will Thank You

 

Reviews are important, and every serious author knows that. We beg and pester—and would even bribe readers if it were allowed—to leave reviews describing their experience reading our book.

When that review finally does go up, a moment of panic hits us as we start reading. When we’re finished, we are usually either left with a sense of gratitude or disappointment, a stroked ego or a bruised one. The reader simply either did or did not like our work.

Most times, the one thing we don’t take away from the review is why the reader felt a certain way. Sure, we hear them. They hated it—in all caps, I might add. Or, they absolutely loved it and it was the best book ever written. (Who doesn’t like reading those kinds of reviews?)

To grow as an author, we need more. More importantly, potential readers need more. When you post a review, people read it in hopes that they can learn something from it. Sure, you thought the book was great or that it was terrible. But, why?

Did you think Detective Sanchez falling in love with his arch-rival was clichéd or the perfect plot twist? Give a vague, spoiler-free explanation about how the main plot twist felt like a cliché. Did a specific character annoy you because they were unlikable? Or, did they make choices that seemed out of character? There’s nothing wrong with saying so.

What did you like about the book? Were you drawn in by the setting, the mystery? Was the narration funny or insightful? Did the characters feel authentic and the situations they encountered keep you engaged in the story?

This is the kind of feedback authors and potential readers need to know. Authors need constructive criticism to grow and write better books in the future, while readers need to choose a book that is right for them. They’ll look over the review section to learn about the quality of the book and if it’s something they would like to invest their time in. So when you go to write your review, consider what you did or didn’t like about it and why. Remember, you’re helping an author whose works you’ve already invested time in to write better books, and to help readers find books they would actually enjoy, so be encouraging as well as honest.

Overall, any review is better than no review at all (except in the case of outright trolls) so if you don’t want to include this sort of information, I’m certain your review is still greatly appreciated. However, if reviewing books has become a habit of yours—maybe you’re starting a blog and want to make a reputation for yourself—this would be the best way to leave professional, thoughtful reviews from which authors and readers alike will benefit.

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Jessica Fisette is the author of The Vanquished, the first book in The Soul Reaper series, and Fragments, a short story. Her hobbies include discovering the benefits of natural medicine, wine tasting, and trying new recipes in the kitchen. She likes to unwind by typing out a scene or two in her latest obsession or indulging in a good book. Having been passionate about writing since she was a little girl, she is constantly coming up with new ideas for future stories and creating unique, strong willed- albeit flawed- characters to overcome the difficult obstacles she places before them.

Follow my blog at: www.jessicavictoriafisette.com Link to The Vanquished: http://amzn.to/2eq2Vzn Link to Fragments: http://amzn.to/2ftFdSS