Tag Archives: motivation

Michele Sayre: A Thousand Words (give or take) – Writing From Different Places

A Thousand Words (give or take) – Writing From Different Places

By Michele Sayre

First, I’ve retitled my blog yet again because the title I had before was a bit limiting. But it wasn’t just the title I was having trouble with.

For the last three and a half years I’ve been wanting to write book-length non-fiction and also shorter non-fiction pieces like blog entries and essays. Yet I couldn’t stay with that type of writing and I’ve been trying to figure out why. I knew I was coming to non-fiction from a very personal and emotional perspective but I wasn’t quite aware that I write from a completely difference place inside of me unlike how I write fiction and poetry.

Here’s how I figured out I write from two different places inside me.

With fiction, I write from a place of excitement born from my imagination and inspiration. When I get an idea for a fiction story, I get really excited. My heart pounds and my nerves hum and all I want to do is write the story. I don’t plan our plot out my stories and yes, I get bogged down and even driven nuts by that. But it’s still a place of excitement even when the story is emotionally gut-wrenching.

With non-fiction, I don’t feel that excitement at all. I don’t feel my heart pounding and my nerves humming in anticipation. I write non-fiction sometimes starting out with a weigh on my chest that almost makes it hard for me to breathe. I write it sometimes on the edge of bawling my eyes out. I write it thinking so hard my brain almost hurts and my eyes cross and burn.

With fiction I feel great joy in telling a story. Sometimes I feel like a kid sitting down to hear a story read to me, or opening a book for the very first time, or sitting in a darkened movie theater. It’s a need and an intense desire to be a part of that rich storytelling tradition.

With non-fiction, it’s about getting my emotional baggage out of my head and a ton of difficult thoughts in order. It’s a need to share, but not from a place of joy like fiction. And this has been a hard realization for me, but a much-needed and very welcome one for me, too. This realization has lifted a big weight off my shoulders I’ve been trying to lift for a long time. Knowing I write non-fiction from a different place inside me and that it’s not a joyful one helps me understand it’s okay to feel like I do about it. It also tells me I’m okay in not working on the non-fiction all the time because if I did I’d probably go clear around the bend to crazy-town. I thought it was because they were big projects with a lot of moving parts but it’s what I have to think and feel in order to write them.

Writing is like falling down a rabbit-hole into Wonderland sometimes with all its’ assorted pitfalls and weird shit to deal with. For me, understanding why I write what I want to has been a big part of my life over the four years. I say I have a complicated relationship with writing and not just because I’ve been doing it for so long, and not just because of how I started, but because of what it’s led me to.

I’ve written a lot of stuff over the last four years that’s been very intense and emotional as hell for me. I’ve shared some of it but most of it has been trashed as I’ve deemed it too raw and unfocused. I see it was now just me venting off excess thoughts and emotions because I know as a writer I can’t just rant-and-rave on the page and edit the crap out of it to get something meaningful. For me, there has to be focus in what I put out there. I’m very good with fiction now in terms of staying on track so now I’ve just got to figure out how to do that with my non-fiction work.

And another thing that’s interesting is how I write poetry. That’s a bit of mix between that humming energy of fiction with the weight of non-fiction. My poetry comes out pretty fast and then I edit it down from there. It flows pretty quickly out of me but it’s almost like I’m desperate to get it out of me.

I think a lot of writers would refer to my difficulties in writing as ‘writer’s block’, and I think that’s a valid term here. I’ve never dismissed the term ‘writer’s block’ as I know that there are times when a writer can’t write and they have to figure out why. Stepping away from the keyboard and going inside your head, especially into the storage unit as I call it, isn’t easy. But like I’ve said before, it’s more than worth it.

I feel better now having written this out. I feel a weight coming off me and a clarity that is sharper than before. I’ve had a lot of these moments of clarity as I call them over the last four years or so and though this one doesn’t have me jumping for joy, I’m grateful for it.

About Michele Sayre:

Writer of fiction, non-fiction, and poetry. Native Texan, Uber-driver, taco lover, mom to chonky cat and diva dog.

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Please visit Michele’s blog for more amazing insights into the writer and the writing process: https://michelesayre.wordpress.com/

Please note: the images used are free-use images and do not require attribution.

Michele Sayre: Why Do You Want to Write?

Why Do You Want to Write?

by Michele Sayre

I see so many people in writer’s groups ask how do I write and where do I begin?

The better question to ask is this: why do you want to write in the first place?

Is it because you love to read and want to write stories from your own imagination?

Is it because you feel you have something you want to share with other people and maybe help them?

Because in order to figure out how to write and where to begin, you have to know why you want to write in the first place. When I first started many years ago, it was a combination of an overactive imagination and a love of stories that I wanted to share. Now it’s about sharing my own life stories in the hope that it will help other people in addition to sharing stories from my imagination.

And how do I do that?

I sit down and write with whatever materials I have to work with. Many years ago when I was young, I started out writing with paper and pencil, then I graduated to a typewriter, then a word processor, and finally a laptop computer. I knew early on that I had to put the words down then edit them until they flowed as well as I could make them flow. Also, I knew I had to research things on my own and back when I started writing those many years ago, the internet didn’t exist at all.

I will freely admit here I’ve always been, and still am, baffled by people who seem to have decided one day out of the blue to take up writing. Maybe they see it as a hobby like knitting or woodworking where you just pick up some tools and materials, read some books or watch videos, then make your projects. The thing with writing is that you can pick up things like paper, pencils, or computers, and you can read books about writing and watch videos. But writing isn’t a pre-made project you can make from a book or a video. It’s something you have to create from scratch. You have to come up with the words to say what you want to say in order to tell your stories.

You have to make your own decisions as to what to write and how to write. And if you’re afraid of upsetting someone or someone not liking what you write, that’s something you’re going to have to work through. You can’t please everyone with everything you write so you have to learn not to write with that in mind at all. You have to be independent and motivated by your own need and desire to create.

No one knows everything, especially about writing. Writing is a constant learning process that keeps it from being boring though it can make things frustrating, too. I know very well this world we live in isn’t perfect, that I’m not perfect, and I’m certainly not a perfect writer. But there is no need for perfection at all, even in writing. Because what works for one person and makes them fall in love with what they read will leave another person completely out in the cold.

So for me, being an independent person with an overactive imagination has benefited me greatly as a writer. Yet it has made it hard for me to understand why people want to write when they don’t seem to have much of an imagination to begin with, or be independent enough to think and try solve their problems on their own. Maybe it was because when I started writing I didn’t have the internet to reach out to people or instant resources to access. But even if I’d had instant access to people and information back then I seriously doubt I would have used that access a lot. Because despite all that’s available now in the end, a writer still has to write their words.

Words will not always flow smoothly or easily. In fact, more often than not it will be a struggle to get something out. Sometimes something comes out very smoothly for me but then I have to go back and edit stuff out because although it’s good, it’s not on track. But I’m not afraid to just write knowing full-well I’ll have to go back and edit. If that’s something you have an issue with, that’s something you’ll have to work through in order to write, too.

For me, writing isn’t a popularity contest. And it’s not something I do to prove a point or anything along that line. I do it because despite all its’ difficulties, I love it. I love it when my words come together and reach people. I love being a part of a community that’s been there throughout the ages sharing stories. And because I believe in a quote from the television show ‘Doctor Who’:

“In the end, we’re all stories. So make it a good one.” (written by Stephen Moffat)

Please visit Michele’s blog: https://michelesayre.wordpress.com/

Please note: the images used are free-use images and do not require attribution.

Adam J. Johnson: Train Your Brain

Welcome back! Last time we talked about why mindset matters. A positive mindset causes action and confidence, but a negative mindset results in a lack of both. We also talked about the insecurities that cause a negative mindset. Now, everyone’s journey is different so your areas of focus will be different from others, but only you can truly validate what those areas are. We often just live with these issues and try to succeed despite them and actually, you can! However, if you don’t deal with these issues, you will never reach your full potential. There will always be a battle between your insecurities and your goals, so why not just address them? Be brutally honest with yourself, face your insecurities, and tell them that you will not be their prisoner any longer. So let’s hop right in and get to resetting that mindset!

We’ll start with developing a positive state of mind. Ultimately it’s the positive mindset that will help us attack our projects with more confidence. So, first thing we should start with is retraining our thought processes. Negative thoughts are natural, so don’t feel ashamed to have them, just identify them for what they are—a product of our experiences. Start with simply identifying when you have a negative thought. When that ugly thought surfaces, stop and make note of it. Say to yourself, “That was negative.” Once you’ve trained yourself to be constantly aware of the negative thoughts entering your brain, then we can start taking action against it! When a negative thought enters your mind and you’ve identified it, think at least three positive thoughts to follow. This may not come easily to all of us as some of us have become comfortable with negative thoughts. Some of us even glorify them and think that a cynical view of the world is smart and will keep you safe from being burned. This may be true to a small extent, but will ultimately hold you back from achieving your goals.

So, you are flooded with negative thoughts and are cynical in your view. Thinking positive thoughts can seem corny, right? That is simply a personal quirk that you have developed based on your life experiences and your need to feel comfortable. Even if it seems corny, convince yourself to follow up every negative thought with at least three positive thoughts for at least a week! After all, you can do anything new for a week, right?  I suggest keeping a journal of your thoughts and mood throughout the week and reflect on it after the week is up. I guarantee you that by the end of the week, your mood will be elevated, even if only slightly. What if you’re bad at thinking positively? Then it will take longer for you to reset your mindset, but it’s even more important that you do. Positivity exists everywhere and it’s up to each individual to see it. If you’re bad at it, then find three things that you do see positively. When a negative thought crosses your mind, repeat those three positive thoughts to yourself. Once you start to expand your outlook, start swapping out the three thoughts with new ones that you’ve discovered along the way until you can randomly pull three positive thoughts with every negative one.

Once you see it’s working, it should be no trouble to keep doing it moving forward. After one to two months, you will see a huge difference in your outlook and default mood. This may seem like a long time to sustain a practice, but think about it. We’re writers—we spend months or years on a single project and are usually content to do so. We make the investment in our work, so be courageous enough to make an investment in yourself. When you do, you will be more confident in your work and will be more aggressive in getting it out there.

Why do you think that is? It’s simple, really. The more confidence we have in ourselves directly translates to the confidence that we have in our work. If we are more confident in our work, then we will not be afraid to share it with the world! So, let’s recap.

  1. Identify negative thoughts.
  2. Train yourself to replace negative thoughts with positive ones.
  3. Build confidence in your writing.
  4. Share with the world!

Now that we’ve established how to get the ball rolling on changing to a positive mindset, you are truly equipped to start beating insecurities!! I truly hope this has helped in any way and if you have questions, feel free to reach out!

Happy writing,

Adam J. Johnson

Michele Sayre: WRITING INSPIRATION BULLOCKS

I’m sure there is someone out in this world who would love to slap my mouth shut for putting those three words together in today’s blog title. But sometimes I feel like all I see when it comes to writing is finding the motivation and inspiration to write instead of complete works of writing instead.

So in response to all that glorious writing motivation and inspiration I say this:

You don’t have to write.

I know you may feel like if you don’t write your brain is going to explode or all your wonderful ideas and stories will just die with you and take a few million years to regroup from the stardust of your demise. But that’s not going to happen because you felt like you had to write, but because you went out and wrote then edited the crap out of what you wrote till it shined like a clean toilet.

I write despite all the bullshit that comes along with it. But I refuse to be all high-and-mighty and lofty and say ‘I have to write’. No, for me it is a conscious choice to park my butt and write the words and edit the crap out of them before I share them with the rest of the world.

For me it’s never been about having the need to write, but wanting to do it. It’s wanting to see the words hit the page, wanting to push myself to sharpen them to the brightest points, and hearing their truth not just inside my head, but with my own ears, too.

I know I don’t have to be in the perfect mood to write. I know my mind can be a mess and most of all, I know it doesn’t have to be set in a certain way. I can write in a flying-hot good mood, or in a dark and cold pisser of a mood. And I can always edit until I get it to where it flows the way I want it to. I don’t have to kill my darlings but instead keep at them until they make it out of the jungle of my mind.

I don’t need a room of my own, or a lot of time, either. And as for the thoughts that question the worth of my words and whether they’re good enough for others to see, bullocks to them. I know someone out in the world won’t like me and what I write, but I’ve kept on going despite being told that in more variations than I care to admit to. Every day I feel like I’m learning more and more how to kick that crap out of my way even when it keeps coming into my path.

So if you’re looking for any writing inspiration from me I’ll tell you one thing: write because you want to, and never mind the bullocks that comes along with it.

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Please visit Michele Sayre’s website:
https://tinyurl.com/yb42gyt2

Adam J. Johnson – Mindset Matters

Writing challenges us in many ways. It can be frustrating, right? It can also be a real source of joy and accomplishment. So, why do we let writing frustrate us? We know that it’s something we love to do. We know that we feel great when we’ve finally written “The End” on a long project, or we’ve finished up that last round of editing—and yet, it still frustrates us. Our old friend self-doubt stops by for a visit and always overstays its welcome. Why do you think that is? We are so excited for the projects we start, and then the doubt crawls in. “What if I get rejected?” “I’m probably not talented enough to get this published.” Does any of that sound familiar? That is your mindset taking hold of your actions.

Mindset affects every aspect of your life, even if you don’t recognize it. A positive mindset leads to action! When you approach anything—life, work, or hobbies—with a positive mindset, you are setting yourself up for success! Let’s define that so we are all on the same page. Your mindset is the way that you view the world around you as well as the way you view yourself. Ask yourself, “Am I a cynical person or a positive person?” “Do I ooze confidence or do I hide my true self from the world?” “Do I finish the writing projects that I start or do they get filed away for no one to see?” Your answers to those questions are a direct result of your mindset—but good news! You’ve just taken the first step to developing a positive mindset, and that first step is self-awareness.

With any change you wish to make in your life, you have to start with identifying the problem areas. So those questions you just answered are a great insight into where your mindset is currently. If you answered negatively across the board, there’s a good chance that your mindset is actually holding you back from completing your projects. Writers typically struggle with self doubt so, don’t worry, you most certainly are not alone!

Once you’ve developed a positive mindset, then self-doubt starts to subside to make room for your newly cultivated confidence. Changing that mindset isn’t always easy, is it? Some of us acknowledge the negative mindset and try to change it for years with no results. Sometimes we say it’s too hard or, “That’s just the way I am, there’s no changing it.” Yes, every one of us is different, but you know that those are just excuses to ignore the problem. If you’re fortunate enough to be aware of flaws in your character or mindset, then the only thing that’s holding you back from changing it is the truth.

You have to be brutally honest with yourself. Be critical and accept the flaws you have. Don’t just focus on surface issues like, “I wish my diet was better,” or “I’m unhappy with the state of my living room.” Dig deep and be honest about the real insecurities you live with and ignore.  Accept that you may be insecure about your image. Accept that you may be afraid of the judgment of others. Those real truths about who you are at your core will help you resolve those deep issues. Everybody has insecurities, and most of us developed coping mechanisms early on to offset them so we can lead a happy life with those issues tucked neatly in a folder, that’s inside a box, that sits in the back of our closet where we never have to look at them. Problem solved, right? … Not a chance!

These are the issues that we must address. These are the issues that influence our mindset, which in turn influences us to act according to the way we see the world or ourselves. If you are living with insecurities, chances are you will never reach your full potential or even push yourself to see what that potential could be. Those insecurities will cause you to give up on projects and let fear win when new but challenging opportunities arise. Let’s start taking steps to build and sustain a positive mindset. After all, a positive mindset is a vehicle for powerful and confident action.

I can’t wait to see what 2019 will bring for us all! Join us next when we will talk about how to deal with those insecurities and get to writing!

Adam J Johnson: Defeating Doubt: How to Stop Holding Back

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When you found a true passion for writing, did you know it would be so hard? You love the creativity, crafting a story, but the business end of it seems daunting? That’s because it can be! You put your heart into a story, it’s your baby, and then you present it to the world. It might get rejected by publishers and editors might tell you to change it. People might even say you will never make it as an author. How can they say all that when you put so much emotion, so much effort into it? All the negativity can build on us and eventually get us to question our own abilities—even possibly believing what they say. Sometimes, unfortunately, it causes some to give up. This is our familiar friend, doubt. Doubt will always be there. It stifles creativity and kills success. So, how do we get past it? How do we become successful in the face of such a vile enemy?

Doubt is a natural coping mechanism. When we create and step out of our comfort zone, it’s a risk. We disrupt the safe state of our lives then doubt steps in to tell us not to take a risk because we are already comfortable—safe. While it may keep us comfortable, it also keeps us stagnant. The first step to defeating doubt is to acknowledge when it happens. When you hear that voice pop up saying, “I’m not good enough,” or “I’ll never make it,” identify that as doubt holding you back to keep you comfortable. We don’t want to just be comfortable, do we? We want to step out of our comfort zone because that’s where our current situation ends and growth begins. Stepping out of your comfort zone and denying doubt is the first step on the pathway to success.

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Once you’ve acknowledged that nagging voice of self-doubt, you can begin to fight it and change your mindset. When it pops up, replace doubt with positive rhetoric. Tell yourself, “no, I can do this” or “yes, I am good enough!” Self-talk is a huge factor in your overall mindset and success. A lot of you may think mantras or self-affirmations are silly or a waste of time, but they truly do change the landscape of your mind. When trying new things, it usually takes around 30 days for something to become a habit and 90 days for it to become a lifestyle. The same is true for your self-talk and its direct correlation to your quality of life. When you repeat to yourself, “I’m unstoppable,” or “I can make my dreams come true,” or any positive message that you need in your life, it starts to become a part of you. If you repeat that for 30 days, how do you think you will feel? How about 60? How about 90? You will start to feel unstoppable, you will start to feel like you can grab your dreams and make them a reality. The same happens to us when we let doubt have a defining voice in our minds.

Think about it, how long have you had self-doubt? How long have you thought that you aren’t good enough or even that you don’t have enough time in the day? Chances are, it’s been more than 90 days, meaning that mindset has become a part of who you are. Doubt has become a guide in your life. This is nothing to be ashamed of. As previously stated, doubt is a mechanism to keep us safe and comfortable. We are only doing what will keep us safe. So don’t be ashamed of the doubt because it’s present in all of useven the Titans of our craft suffer from doubt. The main difference is, they have conquered doubt, stepped out of their comfort zone and made the necessary adjustments to walk the road of success. Stephen King even fell victim to doubt. When he was an aspiring author he faced rejection after rejection. It came to a point where he let his doubt win and threw his newly-completed manuscript in the trash saying, “it’s no use, it will just be rejected.” His wife had so much faith in him that she pulled that manuscript out of the trash and sent it in for him. The manuscript that his wife sent in brought his first publishing contract. It was for a story you may have heard ofit was called “Carrie.”

So again, do not let doubt beat you into submission. Keep fighting it and stepping out of your comfort zone until you are successful because the key to success lies in each of us. Sometimes we just need a little push from someone who believes in us. If you don’t have that support, you need to be your own support, because if it is truly your dream then nobody can bring it to life except you. There are three simple steps to follow when overcoming doubt and freeing yourself from holding back.

  1. Identify negative self-talk
  2. Replace it with positive motivation
  3. Take action toward your goal.

Don’t think I’m offering you a quick fix for your self-doubt because that will only breed frustration and even stronger doubt. The road to defeating self-doubt is not an easy one or a fast one. You must constantly remind yourself that you ARE capable, you ARE good enough, and you WILL accomplish your goals. When you feel that doubt, that is the perfect time to take action. When you feel like you aren’t good enough to write that story, that’s when you write that story. If you think you shouldn’t send out a manuscript because they won’t accept it, that’s when you send out that manuscript. When you get into that positive cycle of challenging negative self-talk, replace it with positive. By taking action against the doubt, you will find yourself becoming more productive. You will find yourself becoming more positive. You will find yourself becoming more successful and ultimately, you will find yourself being a happier version of yourself.

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Thank you all for spending this time with me and the rest of the Admin team from Writers Unite! We hope you Live Limitless and not only chase but live your dreams!

Adam J. Johnson: Live Limitless

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Hello, everyone!

It’s an absolute pleasure to be here on this terrific platform. Some of you know me, and some of you don’t, so why don’t we get to know each other!? A little bit about me—

My name is Adam J. Johnson. I’m father to a beautiful 13-year-old girl who not only keeps me on my toes but continually teaches me new life lessons. I’ve been a hospitality industry professional for sixteen amazing years and have been writing seriously for about five years. I’ve recently decided to take all those wonderful skills I’ve built up over the years and use them to help others break through their barriers. My mission is ultimately to make the biggest possible positive impact I can in the world! That’s how Adam J. Johnson Coaching was born.

I’ve always loved making a positive impact in people’s lives which is what led me to the Hospitality industry and ultimately what led me here—with all of you. It’s my mission to constantly add value to myself so I can add more and more value to other people’s lives. Think about it—how many times have you felt unfulfilled in your job, relationships, and life in general? Wouldn’t you take the steps necessary to experience profound changes and enrich your life and relationships? That is just the beginning of what I hope to do for anyone reading this blog page, and don’t be afraid to share it with others who could use more positivity in their world!

This is a just a short introduction, but I will be covering a variety of topics in the weeks to come. I will provide you with the tools and tactics to break through your mental barriers and lead a fuller, happier life! Thanks for reading.

Remember: stay hungry, be happy, and live limitless!

Adam J. Johnson

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Writer’s Resolutions and How to Stick to Them

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With the New Year, many people, including writers, make resolutions. They resolve to do more or to do better. But then life gets in the way, sometimes in a big way, and things go off-track.

So as a writer, how can you make resolutions then stick to them through thick and thin?

First, be realistic. If you’ve never completed a novel before, your chances of completing more than one in the year are a bit a slim. And I’m not saying that to be a downer but in this case, the first goal should be to complete the first novel before moving on to the second one. But, if you have completed a novel then you’ve proven to yourself you can do that again and again. And if you accomplish something during the year then you can add on to it.

Second, don’t beat yourself up if you don’t get something done. The world is not going to end if you fail to meet a goal you set for yourself. Life happens more often than not but even if that’s not the case and you just get bogged down in fear, doubt, or boredom, kicking yourself while you’re down won’t accomplish anything. So be kind to yourself no matter what happens.

And third, celebrate your achievements no matter how big or small. Writing is a physical act and every part of the process is an accomplishment in itself. Don’t put yourself down by saying you could have done more, or that it’s not good enough, or that it needs a lot of editing, or anything negative. Of course your writing is going to need editing and revising as nothing comes out completely perfect in first-draft form. But celebrate the fact that you have words to revise and edit.

So if you have set any writing resolutions for yourself remember these three things:

  • Be realistic in what you can do though don’t be afraid to push yourself.
  • Be kind to yourself if you don’t achieve a particular goal.
  • Celebrate your achievements both big and small.

Best wishes on your writing for 2017!