Tag Archives: indie authors

An Anniversary

 
As you know, over the last three years Writers Unite! has grown into one of the largest closed writing groups on Facebook. What many of you may not know since you haven’t been with us the entire three years is that we had a pivotal moment that spurred our growth.
 
When now admin Paul Reeves joined Writers Unite!, he reached out to us about appearing on his radio program out of Detroit. I was chosen to be the voice of WU! for the interview, and on July 11, 2016, I had my first interview on Dr. Paul’s Family Talk.
 
Membership was at 6,600 that day. We began to see an uptick in member requests immediately and had added a thousand or more new members by the time I appeared the second time on the show in August 2016. Again, we saw the numbers begin to rise. Shortly after that, Facebook started to advertise us aggressively. As a fast-growing group, their algorithms picked up the increases and began to market us.
 
Our growth is indicative of what marketing can do. We did nothing different to promote WU! at that time other than appearing on Paul’s show. While not all our growth is attributed to his show directly, some has been by word of mouth, our appearance there was the catalyst that allowed us to grow.
 
Learn a lesson from this. Marketing matters. Do not shy away from doing interviews, go on the radio, do print interviews, do a book signing anywhere you can, send those emails blasts. It can work if you keep trying.
 
Over the last two years, Paul, through his radio program and his desire to contribute to Writers Unite! as an admin has helped us sustain this growth by providing a platform for authors to tell their story. WU! continues to appear on the show to offer writing information and many of the authors Paul has interviewed have become active members of the group.
 
We are grateful to Paul for his contributions to the group. Together, the WU! admin team is striving to offer media exposure, through Dr. Paul’s Family Talk and the anthology series for our members.
 
Without question, thanks above all to the members for being with us. You are what makes WU! successful!
 
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Below is a link to the first interview, WU! did on Dr. Paul’s Family Talk. Then on terrestrial radio in Detroit. The show is now broadcast live on Impact Radio USA. http://www.impactradiousa.com/
 
Writers Unite! on Dr. Paul’s Family Talk July 11, 2016
 
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Pricing: A Personal View

Greetings one and all. I have seen a number of posts over my time here regarding the tricky issue of pricing. I rather suspect that there is no formula to adopt and that it is very much a personal choice based on your own set of criteria.

Hopefully, it will be of use to some of you for me to set out the decisions that I made and the reasons behind them.

I am including personal sales information in this article, simply to help those who are starting the author journey to understand the financial decision-making tree a little better.

My motivation for writing was not to make money, but to tell the story that I had always wanted to tell. That governed my decision-making throughout. In any case, I never imagined that I would sell many books, so the experience and the end product were paramount in my view.

Once I had set myself on that path, the pricing strategy was easy to decide upon. Pricing to encourage people to read meant aiming relatively low.

At that time, I looked at e-book pricing and thought that, despite being new into the field, the download version was a tad overpriced, compared to the book you buy on the High Street.

The decision to pitch my e-book under High Street prices seemed reasonable enough, and many authors seemed to agree.

I spoke with friends, relatives, and acquaintances in the USA, and the general feeling from them was ‘something’ and 99 cents was appropriate. Against advice, I settled on $4.99 as my e-book price. Bear in mind at this point that my first book, Opening Moves, was 812 pages.

Quite clearly if I had been in it for the money, creating two books out of that lot would have been easy enough. However, that was where the book finished and that was that.

So Opening Moves was set at $4.99 for Kindle, and equivalent across the other kindle selling platforms from Japan to Germany. For some reason, I also decided to have a common pricing policy and, having openly stated that in RG forums and on the website, I was committed to it.

The royalties from e-sales are shown in the charts attached, so I won’t repeat them here.

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It was when I went to Createspace that the ‘size V amount of work V royalty’ issue raised its ugly head.

Createspace is an on-demand publisher, which simply means that when you click to buy, they print the book and send it to you. This means that their costs are higher than those of a traditional publisher. Naively, I hoped to pitch the book at around High Street price, or maybe just a little more, considering its size. I was in for a shock. Createspace, so I thought, set a minimum price at which they can make a profit and give you a small royalty. I was horrified to find that the minimum price I could place the book on sale for was £14.67….. and that gave me precisely £00-00 royalties.

All of a sudden I was thrust into the world of stepping a book up to a higher cost simply to try and earn a little from my endeavours. I should say at this point that I was constantly receiving input from friends and relatives, and my heart was torn between my initial pricing thoughts and the reality of writing for nothing.

I decided to price ‘Opening Moves’ at $19.99 / £16.99, which offered me royalties of $1.42 and £1.39 per hard copy. When you consider what the reader is paying out, that represents a lot less in %age terms than a traditionally published author, according to my research, whereas the e-books certainly seem to be more.

My books tended to terminate in natural breaks, with two notable exceptions. Book#2 ‘Breakthrough’ topped 330,000 words, and I was told that it was too much. I split it into #2 and #3 and published them shortly after one another.

Book#7 ‘Endgame’ proved to be otherwise and spawned a final book. It had been my intent to finish on #7 but I simply could not get the story in satisfactorily. In the end, Book#8 ‘Caïssa’ was born and became the smallest book I produced [except for the bio sets that accompany each book]. It is also the only book for which I have received complaints regarding size, suggesting that it was too small. I suspect I am a victim of my own standards in that regard.

With my profit making head on, it is for certain sure that I could have done the same amount of writing, produced nearer twelve books of acceptable size, and gained probably 25% or so more royalties.

In the attached charts, you can see the values involved and I hope that they make the situation just a little clearer for you.

As I said earlier, making money was not my prime concern. However, it is now a serious concern, having been shown how much money can be made if you get lucky and with the sirens of early retirement singing soft music in my ears 🙂

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None the less, I stick to my pricing policy . . . even after looking at the figures on the charts I prepared for your gaze!

As an aside, I do wonder how often readers check on book details before they buy.

In a bookshop, it is a simple task. You can see pretty much all you need to know. But e-sales pose a different scenario, and I am certainly sure that some unscrupulous writers take advantage of the hidden nature of size/pages/content. If you look at Amazon, it won’t take you too long to find a book of less than a hundred pages for sale at prices that would bring a tear to your eye.

You have no input over ‘pages read’ royalties, except to decide if you wish to enter the programme or not.

I am a member of KDP and KU, and believe I make some nice extra royalties from it, as well as enjoy the daily climb in pages read from Brazil to Australia.

So to summarise, my advice would be to decide upon your whole purpose behind writing and make your decisions accordingly. I certainly believe that you can price yourself out of contention, and equally give away your work. I have seen statements such as ‘if you don’t value it, how will others value it?’ A fair point. In the end, you must be comfortable with your decision and remember: It is NOT set in stone and you can alter it whenever you choose.

I hope this has helped you to organise the issue in your mind.

The very best of luck with your work 🙂

Starting Over with Grammar (The Self-Editing Guide Part 4)

Last week, a fellow writer asked me an important question: “What do you suggest as a good resource when editing your novel?” Well, that’s not verbatim, but pretty much. This question made me recall how I felt when just starting to consider “becoming a writer” and beginning that first (serious) novel with the intent to self-publish. I had no confidence. It didn’t matter the good grades I’d gotten in college or how there were little-to-no red marks on my reports when I got them back. I still couldn’t quite recall all the rules I’d learned in elementary about grammar and punctuation. I knew even then that good or bad grammar would either make or break my writing career. I knew things had to be as close to perfect as possible or people would roll their eyes and drop the book I’d worked so hard on, never to be picked up again.

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So before I allowed myself to begin that first paragraph, I decided to start over from the beginning. I found a cheap class online over grammar and punctuation, and I devoted every morning to watching the videos and learning the basics. As if I were hearing these rules for the first time, I wrote everything down. Detailed notes would help me once I’d finished the class and could not go back to reference. Just reconfirming what I already knew and refreshing things I had almost forgotten helped build my confidence tremendously. Something I’d put off for years because I felt I didn’t have enough experience and wasn’t yet qualified now seemed like a possibility for the near future. But I didn’t stop there, and you shouldn’t either. Fast forward three years, and I’ve learned a few of the best tricks to make writing with proper grammar and punctuation go from a foreign language to something you can do in your sleep.

Number One: Get your hands on a seventh-grade English textbook. This may seem silly or you may feel like I’m insulting you—don’t think that—but seventh-grade is the perfect level for you to begin writing your novel. All the basic rules and then some have been covered, and most of it is a review of things learned in the previous grades. So it makes for the perfect, condensed guide if you wish to start from the beginning. Read it from cover to cover. Seriously. Just spend a bit of time going over all the rules and refresh your memory on basic sentence structure, the verb-noun relationship, the Oxford comma, etc. This will help you begin your rough draft at a higher level, and the editing process that comes later will be much simpler. You’ll also want to keep the book on your desk or close by to reference when editing. I suggest you look in old bookstores or resell shops—even a few yard sales might have something you could use as a refresher and save you a few bucks. However, if you would like to save yourself the hassle of searching high and low for one, Amazon always has a range of books on the subject.

Here’s my pick (it won’t break the bank, and it even has a Kindle version): Mastering Grammar (Practice Makes Perfect Series)

Number Two: Join some writing groups with workshops. Writers Unite! offers weekly workshop-type posts that cover many different tips on writing. Many of them cover popular and controversial topics such as when to use “that” and when to cut it out. These are subjects you may not see in an English textbook, but getting such things right is just as important as knowing when to put a comma (hint, hint: It’s not every time you pause mid-sentence). Just search “Workshop” in the group and they should all come up. Many times Deb encourages other members to comment their own tips and tricks or teach a lesson over a grammar pet peeve they have. It’s great to connect with more experienced authors and learn from them what they probably had to learn the hard way. You should join as many beneficial groups you find and soak up all the knowledge they have to offer, but Writers Unite! is definitely one of my favorites when it comes to showing new authors the way.

Join here: Writers Unite!

Number Three: I’m about to sell you on something, but you should keep reading anyway. If you’re new to the writing community, you may not know anything about the different manuals of style. This bit of knowledge is crucial if you plan to query an agent or expect your self-published book to look professional enough to hold its own against traditionally published books. And if you’re an editor, this becomes your go-to guide for the final word on everything you THINK you know. The Chicago Manual of Style is the style publishing companies follow, and they expect your manual to be formatted under the guidelines specified if you submit to them. However, the guide is so much more than how to properly format your novel. It’s about 2.5 to 3 inches thick and covers every question you could possibly have—including all the ones you haven’t yet imagined asking. I used it during a recent editing gig and it was a lifesaver. It earned a spot on my desk from then on. The latest edition is on sale, so right now might be a good time to invest in your writing career by buying this guide.

Get it on Amazon here: The Chicago Manual of Style: 17th Edition

These three are my favorite tips when authors ask me how to improve their grammar and edit effectively. Have any other resources to share? Feel free to comment below with what has worked for you.


Jessica Victoria Fisette is the author of The Soul Reaper series, Fragments, and The Aldurian Chronicles. Her hobbies include discovering the benefits of natural medicine, wine tasting, and trying new recipes in the kitchen. She likes to unwind by typing out a scene or two in her latest obsession or indulging in a good book. Having been passionate about writing since she was a little girl, she is constantly coming up with new ideas for future stories and creating unique, strongwilled—albeit flawed—characters to overcome the difficult obstacles she places before them. Having spent all her life in rural Southeast Texas, she appreciates the tranquility of country living and hopes to implement such a love for nature into her beautiful, ever-so-curious little girl.

You can follow her by clicking the links below.

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To Prologue or not to Prologue (The Self-Editing Guide Part 2)

So here we are at the beginning of our story. Our fingers are on the keys, our pen is twirling in circles over the page (or our thumbs are alternating between various letters and the delete key on our touchscreen) as we try to figure out the best way to start. It only seems natural to start as close to the beginning as possible, right? We can spend the first few pages explaining the main character’s past and bringing our readers up to speed, and then we can see where that takes us. That would be the logical way to go, wouldn’t it? Well, unless your story is a high fantasy containing a completely new world that defies the laws of nature, a rich history that directly impacts the main story, or the main character has a past that cannot be easily explained, you’re probably better off going a different route.

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Prologues have a strong history of being the foundation for many successful and memorable works. Most of the classics contained a prologue, and to this day high fantasy novels usually require them to help the reader understand the new world they are venturing into. Sometimes, prologues are necessary and beneficial. Other times, not so much.

One question we should be asking ourselves is: As a reader, would we want to prep for a story before we were allowed to actually start it? Or would we rather dive right in and have things shown to us between the many adventures? As a confessed prologue-skipper of my youth, I would choose the latter. A story is meant to be engaging and fun, and you’re less likely to pull your readers in with a history lesson before they’ve had a chance to figure out what your novel is about. And if they’re reading the sample from Amazon, they’re unlikely to follow through with a purchase if they can’t grasp some basic understanding of the main plot.

Try, instead, to imagine a situation you would likely find your main character in and start the story there. This is much easier if you’ve already done your due diligence in developing your characters and plot. You should be able to imagine your character and how they would react in any given situation. It’s better if you jump right into the action. Begin as close as possible to the initial problem that sets everything in motion–you might even choose to start with that scene if it isn’t too confusing–and you will find your readers more likely to follow through with purchasing after reading the sample.

If this doesn’t come easy, if after trying and failing you still find your fingers only yearn to write that prologue, go ahead. Write it. Once you’re finished, you’ll likely have a much broader understanding of your plot, and a starting scene should flow freely from your fingertips (or thumbs).

Nothing in life is definite, and not every bit of advice applies to every situation, but if you can reel your readers in with action, you always should. Showing rather than telling pulls the reader into your world, and continuing to dish out in-depth, engaging scenes offers no chance (or desire) for escape, even long after your story has been told.


Jessica Victoria Fisette is the author of The Soul Reaper series, Fragments, and The Aldurian Chronicles. Her hobbies include discovering the benefits of natural medicine, wine tasting, and trying new recipes in the kitchen. She likes to unwind by typing out a scene or two in her latest obsession or indulging in a good book. Having been passionate about writing since she was a little girl, she is constantly coming up with new ideas for future stories and creating unique, strongwilled—albeit flawed—characters to overcome the difficult obstacles she places before them. Having spent all her life in rural Southeast Texas, she appreciates the tranquility of country living and hopes to implement such a love for nature into her beautiful, ever-so-curious little girl.

You can follow her by clicking the links below. 

Facebook

Twitter

Website