Tag Archives: ficton

Bluebell Rizzi : The Inheritance

Welcome to Write the Story! Each month Writers Unite! will offer a writing prompt for writers to create a story from and share with everyone. WU! wants to help our members and followers to generate more traffic to their platforms. Please check out the authors’ blogs, websites, Facebook pages and show them support. We would love to hear your thoughts about the stories and appreciate your support!

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(Please note: the images used as prompts are free-use images and do not require attribution.)

The Inheritance

By Bluebell Rizzi

My granddad used to call for me and my sister before we went to sleep. He’d sit there, in his old green armchair, drinking his blueberry muffin tea. We’d sit on the carpet in our pyjamas. And he would tell us stories. 

Magical stories, of fairies in the garden, wizards in the forests, and the angels that guarded the village. 

Our eyes would go wide, and he’d chuckle into his beard and send us to bed.

We believed him, me and my sister. She doesn’t anymore, though. She’s three years younger than me. She came to see me the other night. We sat out on the deck, and I asked her if she thought granddad might have been telling the truth. She just laughed and lit up a cigarette. 

She’s different, since mum and dad died. More reckless, sarcasm dripping from every word. It’s been five years, but the girl that she was before is gone, perhaps forever.

We lost granddad five months ago. I don’t think he ever got over our parents’ death, and he got sick.

Towards the end, I’d sit by his bed in the old-people’s home. When he wasn’t sleeping, he held my hands and told me a story from when my father was young. 

My grandmother, his wife, passed away in her early thirties, when my father was still a toddler.

When she was a child, she found a pail on her doorstep one morning, five months after her mother died. It was small, pink with yellow dots. She loved it, played with it every day, and kept it as she grew up. She lost it, though, when she was in her twenties. She told my granddad about it many a time.

Five months after she died, my dad found a pink pail with yellow dots on the doorstep. He kept it until he was in his twenties, when he lost it. 

My granddad kept telling me this, over and over. I used to cry, because I knew I was losing him.

Yesterday evening, I went out on my deck, and tripped over something. Cursing, I inspected my scraped leg. Getting up to look for a plaster, I stopped. 

In front of the door lay a pink pail with yellow dots.

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Bluebell Rizzi, is a writer, mainly a poet that dabbles in fiction. Please visit her blog , bluebellforawhile.wordpress.com

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E. C. Fisher – Sally Lou Daisys

Welcome to Write the Story! Each month Writers Unite! will offer a writing prompt for writers to create a story from and share with everyone. WU! wants to help our members and followers to generate more traffic to their platforms. Please check out the authors’ blogs, websites, Facebook pages and show them support. We would love to hear your thoughts about the stories and appreciate your support!

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(Please note: the images used as prompts are free-use images and do not require attribution.)

Sally Lou Daisys

By E.C. Fisher

A legend exists in Rockford Fall, North Dakota, about a young girl who carries a small pink-with-yellow-polka-dotted tin around. You can hear her skip along gravel roads or hop on concrete sidewalks, her tin bucket swinging and rattling along with her. She sounds like a cheerful young girl who is only out to play, but she is anything but cheerful.

In this backwater town not located on any map and far from modern society, Sally Lou Daisys is a vengeful spirit who kills bullies or those who step out of line. It was isolated generations ago to protect the world from Sally Lou as her vengeance seeks any who dare oppose her.

Every generation, without fail, there is always one, one who doesn’t believe the legend, who tests their mantle against her. He or she sets the present generation straight and makes them toe the line. Rockford Falls is the most pleasant town; courteous people, with smiles on their lips, but only their lips.

Every day is a battle, a fight with oneself, to control the urge to shout, yell, or curse. Sally Lou is always watching, waiting, skipping and hopping along through the town. She monitors her captives, waiting for those who brandish ill will. She doesn’t act against the innocence of youth. When a child becomes an adult at fifteen in Rockford Falls, the gloves come off and they’re fair game.

Within a town so isolated, you’d think the residents would have just faltered and stopped having children. You’d think that, right? But, alas, with nothing else to do, people fornicate like rabbits. Maybe it’s the fear that drives them to coupling. Maybe it’s revenge, let their kids feel their grief. I don’t know. Sally Lou holds a death grip on the town and we’re nothing more than offerings to slake her appetite.

Did you hear that? Shh. Listen. Sounds like gravel being kicked. She’s coming.

Did I forget to mention, you can’t escape this town. Visitors may enter, but no one can leave. Oh, what did I do to gain her wrath? Everything. This is my suicide attempt. Without fail. One hundred percent guaranteed success rate. I’ll end this suffering and pray for an afterlife. If hell is my fate, then I welcome the sweeter embrace.

You may find my words contradicting my actions. Don’t be mistaken. This is more like a game of tag. She is going to work for my death. I will parade her around this town. Shouting her name. Let them all see. What can I say, let my death entertain them.

The sound of her cheerful giggles increases as she draws near. The rattle of her bucket and gravel weakens my knees. I curl up in a ball, shut my eyes tight. The sounds abruptly stop behind me.

‘Sally Lou, skips a few, carrying her pail beside her

‘Her dress is blue, with red-stained hands

‘To pluck the heart she desires

‘Be not worried, be not scared, for your death is one of joy

‘In the ground, your soul be bound, in the garden of folly

‘In despair, you lie here as my hand reaches for you

‘I grip your heart and pull it out

‘Feast your eyes, I gain my prize and place it in my pail

‘Sally Lou, hops a few, carrying her full pail to her garden

‘She digs a hole and sets the soul

‘Adding another to her garden of folly

Visit E. C on Facebook and give him a like! www.facebook.com/ecfisherauthor

WRITE THE STORY: June 2019 PROMPT

June 2019 Prompt

Write the Story June 2019 Prompt

Here’s the plan:

You write a story of 3000 words or less (doesn’t matter, can be 50 words or a poem) and post it on the author site that you want to promote. Please edit these stories. We will do minor editing but if the story is not written well WU! reserves the right to reject publishing it.

Send the story and link to the site via Facebook Messenger to Deborah Ratliff. Put “Write the Story” in the first line of the message. We do ask that you join Writers Unite! on Facebook to participate. https://www.facebook.com/groups/145324212487752/

WU! will post your story on our blog and share across our platforms, FB, Twitter, Instagram, etc. WU! will also add the story to the Write the Story page on our blog…where it be for all to read along with the other stories.

We do ask that you share the link to the WU! Write the Story page so that your followers can also read the works of your fellow writers.

The idea is to generate increased traffic for all. May take some time but it will happen if you participate. The other perk of this exercise is that you will also have a blog publishing credit for your work.

The June prompt is posted above… write the story!

Periodically throughout the month, we will post the current prompt as a reminder.

DO NOT post your story to this prompt. The idea is to have your STORY or poem published on your site, the WU! blog and shared to gain followers for your writing. We will not accept a one- or two-line caption. For the most part, we are fiction writers and poets…. please write a story or poem, not a caption.

If you have any questions regarding this, you may ask the question in the comments.

Thank you.

(Please note: the images we will use as prompts are free-use images and do not require attribution.)

Write the STory: April 2019 Prompt


Please note: the images used as prompts are free-use images and do not require attribution.)

***** Write the Story April 2019 Prompt ****

Here’s the plan:

You write a story of 3000 words or less (doesn’t matter, can be 50 words or a poem) and post it on the author site that you want to promote. Please edit these stories. We will do minor editing but if the story is not written well WU! reserves the right to reject publishing it.

Send the story and link to the site via Messenger to Deborah Ratliff. Put “Write the Story” in the first line of the message.

WU! will post your story on our blog and share across our platforms, FB, Twitter, Instagram, etc. WU! will also add the story to the Write the Story page on our blog…where it be for all to read along with the other stories.

We do ask that you share the link to the WU! Write the Story page so that your followers can also read the works of your fellow writers.

The idea is to generate increased traffic for all. May take some time but it will happen if you participate. The other perk of this exercise is that you will also have a blog publishing credit for your work.

The April prompt is below… write the story!

Periodically throughout the month, we will post the current prompt as a reminder.

DO NOT post your story to this prompt. The idea is to have your STORY or poem published on your site, the WU! blog and shared to gain followers for your writing. We will not accept a one- or two-line caption. For the most part, we are fiction writers and poets…. please write a story or poem, not a caption.

If you have any questions regarding this, you may ask the question in the comments.

Thank you.

(Please note: the images we will use as prompts are free-use images and do not require attribution.)