Karl Taylor: Writer’s Block

It was fourth and goal at the opponent’s three-yard line. They trailed by four points. The game was on the line. The season was on the line. How this young man would be remembered in this small west Texas town would be determined on this play.

He called the play and they broke the huddle. The crowd on both sides of the field was losing their minds. The noise was deafening and he could actually feel the ground shake beneath his feet. He approached the line and had a look around. The game clock was running, 23, 22, 21. He looked over  the defensive formation. He liked the play they had called. He checked behind him to see that the tailback was in the right place. He looked to either side at the receivers. Everything looked good.  He checked the play clock, 12, 11, 10. The defense was yelling, barking and growling. They were doing anything they could to distract him. It was now or never. He barked out the signals and the ball was snapped. And? And? And?

Oh my! My brain froze up. Do I have him toss the ball to the tailback and watch helplessly as he runs for the corner of the end zone? Do I have the quarterback roll out and look for an opening to the end zone? Do I have him drop back and throw it to the frightened little freshman who was a water boy just two weeks ago? Does he fall back to pass and trip over his untied shoelace and fall flat on his face? Do I have him unleash a missile that sails high and hits the team mascot right between the eyes? Does he succeed? Does he fail?

So many choices and I can’t make up my mind. It’s a turning point in the book and my mind has gone blank. Do I make him a hero? Do I make him the butt of everyone’s jokes? Do I make him just a spectator? I’m stuck. I have no idea what to do next. Oh no! I have writer’s block and I have no idea how to break through. Three hours later, I’m still staring at the screen. My eyes can’t focus. I can’t read anything on my keyboard. My heart is racing and I want to scream at the top of my lungs. Writer’s block? Really? I thought it was just a myth.

Everyone on this planet has their own ways of doing things and if it works for them, then that is the right way, for them. I’m not Stephen King or Tom Clancy or even Dr. Seuss,  but I know what works for me and I wanted to share that with you, because for me, it’s my right way and might help you in some small way.

My first go to is to head straight for my bookshelf. I grab my favorite book by my favorite author.  I need him/her to take me away from this frustrating world I live and write in and make me forget it all for a while.

A lot of times, while I am reading, a little bell will go ding, ding, ding. My subconscious had been working on my problems while I was distracting myself and has come up with the answer. I just keep reading until that little bell goes off letting me know the answer has been found. If reading doesn’t inspire me then it’s on to stage two.

The second phase of my writer’s block strategy is pretty simple… writing prompts. If it is a picture prompt, I stare at it imagining I am in the photo. I can feel the breeze or the cold or the heat beating down, whatever is going on in the picture. I can hear the sounds surrounding me. I can smell the scents that surround me and I ask myself… what happens next? Then I will write a story from 100-1000 words.

If it is a written prompt, I’ll read it several times and close my eyes. I use my imagination to project myself into the setting that the written prompt describes. I take a look around and examine my surrounding and ask the same question… what happens next? Then I will write a story from 100-100o words.

It works best for me if the prompts are for genres that I don’t normally write. Horror and romance are two of my favorites. The idea is to kick start my imagination and creativity and a prompt that is out of my usual comfort zone is usually the best way to do that.

These two simple steps have never failed me. I hope they can work for you. If they don’t, the key is to find what does work for you. I wish you well and keep on writing.

 

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